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Julie & Julia, Nora Ephron’s latest movie, is actually the story of three separate books. Combining Julia Child’s memoir “My Life in Paris” with Julie Powell’s memoir “Julie & Julia,” the story cuts back and forth between the two women’s lives.

Critics have said that the film lacked a uniting thread, since the two women never meet. But it’s right there, in all it’s glory- Julia Child (and Simone Beck)’s own opus, “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” Even before Julia becomes involved in creating it, the book is there. We know that she’ll write it, and we know that it will help define her career. And through Julie’s project of completing all the recipes in the book within a year- it’s impossible to ignore The Book’s presence.

Meryl Streep gives another amazing performance as Julia Child, embodying her so fully that even when watching one of Child’s most famous television appearances being re-enacted by Streep, that it wasn’t jarring in my mind. Amy Adams, as Julie Powell, gives a terrific performance as well. Few articles have said much about the performance, save that they felt Powell was too self-absorbed to embrace as a heroine. Yet, that’s the point. Julie Powell, the real Julie Powell, has a reputation amongst the food community as being self-absorbed and not entirely personable.

That said, the movie is about two very different (and yet similar) women seeking to find themselves through food. Through plenty of beautifully prepared, gorgeously shot food.

As a food enthusiast, a fan of Julia (and Julie Powell’s blog), and as someone who enjoys movies, I highly recommend it.

Originally published at The Fabulous Whitney Drake. You can comment here or there.

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It’s rare that I do a movie review for something that’s been out on DVD for a few years. But Meet the Robinsons is one of those rare movies that was so poorly advertised that it was in theaters very briefly, and came out on DVD with little more than a blip in advertising.

The movie itself is based on William Joyce’s “A Day with Wilbur Robinson,” a children’s book about a boy who spends a day with Wilbur Robinson and his crazy family. The movie itself has a much more involved plot about Lewis (an orphaned inventor who wants nothing more than to be wanted)and his run in with Wilbur Robinson (a strange boy from the future), who claims to be protecting him from the evil Bowler Hat Guy.

The movie was advertised as a time travel movie (it is) with a dinosaur (in one scene, basically) and talking frogs (in a couple scenes). It’s a surprisingly heartfelt movie about love, acceptance, and not dwelling in the past.

It’s very cleverly written, and makes the time travel genre understandable for children. Because of this, hardcore fans of time travel movies (like Back to the Future) might have to put their thinking caps aside.

My only quibble- I hope they fired the agency that convinced Disney that following the box office failure of Chicken Little, that they needed to play up a dinosaur who talked and talking frogs. As great as those were, they completely failed to advertise what was really interesting- a boy looking for who he is.

Originally published at Whitney Drake. You can comment here or there.

thesilversiren: (abstract fire)
It's rare that I do a movie review for something that's been out on DVD for a few years. But Meet the Robinsons is one of those rare movies that was so poorly advertised that it was in theaters very briefly, and came out on DVD with little more than a blip in advertising.

The movie itself is based on William Joyce's "A Day with Wilbur Robinson," a children's book about a boy who spends a day with Wilbur Robinson and his crazy family. The movie itself has a much more involved plot about Lewis (an orphaned inventor who wants nothing more than to be wanted)and his run in with Wilbur Robinson (a strange boy from the future), who claims to be protecting him from the evil Bowler Hat Guy.

The movie was advertised as a time travel movie (it is) with a dinosaur (in one scene, basically) and talking frogs (in a couple scenes). It's a surprisingly heartfelt movie about love, acceptance, and not dwelling in the past.

It's very cleverly written, and makes the time travel genre understandable for children. Because of this, hardcore fans of time travel movies (like Back to the Future) might have to put their thinking caps aside.

My only quibble- I hope they fired the agency that convinced Disney that following the box office failure of Chicken Little, that they needed to play up a dinosaur who talked and talking frogs. As great as those were, they completely failed to advertise what was really interesting- a boy looking for who he is.

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