thesilversiren: (Default)

To those who fear change,

Why do new things scare you so? Do you lack the spirit of an adventurer? Or are you simply afraid that a life that doesn’t change means bad things won’t happen to you?

Not all changes in life are bad. Change brings wonderful things like marriage and children. Change brings the new seasons- changing a dark cold winter into a gentle spring. Or the hot summer to a mild fall. Change gives us the chance to wipe the slate clean and start anew- whether it’s learning something new, losing weight, or simply making a new friend.

Can’t we agree that change is what life is about?

I’m glad you agree. Now can we all stop bitching about the new profile on Facebook? Kthxbai!!

Whitney

Read the rest of this entry » )

Originally published at American Whitney. You can comment here or there.

thesilversiren: (Default)

'You underestimate the Power of Social Networking.'

Wow, last week was a slow blogging week. Not intentional, I assure you. As I blogged, the little guy had a rough week, which meant that I had less computer time and mostly wanted to go straight to bed as soon as they were in bed.

He seems to be doing better- either that or I finally figured out how to help expedite the end of his tantrums. I’m not sure. But somehow we’ve settled into a groove.

But that has nothing to do with social networking. This does. Yesterday morning, a food stylist was on a flight and was pulled from it for questioning before take off. Why? A passenger had noted his “Atom Bomb” tattoo across his fingers and felt he was a flight risk. He explained that Atom Bomb was a nickname, and was allowed back on the flight. But he tweeted about it. His followers shared it, and it spread like wildfire. I’ve yet to see any sort of statement from Delta.

When I shared this link, a family friend shared that she sat next to someone who had recently been reading a book on Islam, but left it at home because he knew someone who’d been pulled off a flight for doing so. I understand that people are still afraid of terrorism, but we’ve become so terrified of something that isn’t so much a risk anymore that now we’re profiling individuals based on their appearance.

Honestly, I probably would have let this slide if it had been the flight crew who were concerned. Or if there had been some sort of comment that was paired with his tattoo that made the passenger think he might be a risk. But it wasn’t. It was one person who looked at him with his tattoos and judged him based on it.

Another friend of mine brought up that like Kevin Smith and SouthWest Airlines, that this was aided by his status as a well known food stylist who was followed on Twitter by celebrity chefs. I’m sure it caused it to spread more quickly, but it’s not like individuals haven’t had their stories heard because they weren’t celebrities. All it took was a catchy video, and the musician whose guitar was destroyed by United Airlines was making the morning news circuit. And Monica Gaudio wasn’t anyone- but it only took a few days for her story about Cooks Source stealing her material to spread across the internet and ruin the magazine.

I’m sure that being a celebrity helps- but honestly, so long as your story is relatable it doesn’t take much for it to go viral. After all, you just have to click Retweet or Share and suddenly, you’re sharing it with all of your friends/followers who can pass it on just as easily. See? That’s the power of social networking. (Admittedly, not all of us regularly crash websites like Neil Gaiman, but you know- we all have reach)

Originally published at American Whitney. You can comment here or there.

thesilversiren: (Default)

Just a few minutes ago, I logged into Facebook to see that one of my favorite ex-Jungle Cruise Skippers, Dr. David Marley (comedian/professor) had posted this:

So the GOP’s plan on stopping Kagan from getting on the Supreme Court is by attacking Thurgood Marshall, the nation’s first African-American Justice. Way to keep it racist, GOP!

Why am I posting this? Almost immediately, two women that I don’t know personally replied that they weren’t racist. Which would be a valid response if he had remotely been calling out Republicans as a whole. Marley does tend to make fun of the GOP a fair amount, but obviously, this was geared towards the Republican senators at Kagan’s confirmation hearing that were using the proceedings to bash Thurgood Marshall.

I was going to write about how common it’s become for people to automatically defend their political party without always reading the original post they’re trying to defend, but I’ve noticed that it’s becoming more and more common for people to skim Facebook status updates and tweets and simply respond.

In the last two weeks, I saw someone comment that they went to the Apple store for a wireless mouse, and someone asked what they bought. I’ve said that I made strawberry ice cream for dessert, and someone asked me what kind of ice cream I made. These weren’t verbose blog posts- they were short status updates or tweets that were around 140 characters. But somehow, reading them in their entirety was too much for people.

Obviously, I don’t believe that 140 characters is too many. I’m a big fan of Twitter, enjoy browsing Facebook statuses, and hope that you’ll read this much longer blog post. But honestly, if someone’s writing something that short- you might as well read it twice just to make sure you didn’t miss anything.

Originally published at American Whitney. You can comment here or there.

thesilversiren: (Default)

Just a couple days ago, I posted my thoughts on the latest Facebook changes. While I tackled the privacy issues first and foremost, there are other concerns. All my interest information is public- and there’s no way to opt out of that, other than to delete it entirely. Not only that, Facebook adjusted how my personal data is used with advertising as well as how it can interact with other sites. Rather than give the opportunity to set those controls manually, Facebook assume that I’d want to join their new program and let my friends share all my information with websites.

So when I saw that the NY Times had Facebook Executive Elliot Schrage (vice president for public policy) sit down for a Q&A session in which he’d answer questions that they’d selected from reader questions, I wanted to see how he’d respond.

Read the rest of this entry » )

Originally published at The Wired Mom. You can comment here or there.

thesilversiren: (Default)

Dear Dad,

I’m sorry I introduced you to Facebook. No, I don’t mean it like that! While I’ve heard plenty of horror stories about family members who overshare, post embarrasing photos, you’ve been wonderful. Honestly, it isn’t you at all.

It’s Facebook. When I recommended that you join Facebook, it was because it was the top ranked social network. True, they did have a history of changing interfaces, but those are easy to get used to. True, they did say that anything you uploaded on Facebook would be their property for all time- but a lot of people complained, and they rolled that change back.

I thought they’d learn, but clearly Mark Zuckerberg hasn’t. He’s stated openly that he believes that privacy isn’t the way of the future. Even as they introduced privacy controls to allow users to decide who sees what statuses, they sneakily reset everyone’s privacy controls to default to allowing Everyone to see what you post.

Read the rest of this entry » )

Originally published at The Wired Mom. You can comment here or there.

Profile

thesilversiren: (Default)
thesilversiren

July 2011

S M T W T F S
      1 2
3456789
10111213 1415 16
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 27th, 2017 02:42 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios